Sale

History of Trafford part two: Sale

Sale is rich in history, it has around 135,000 people living in the area, which historically is in Cheshire, and is considered a desirable area to live in.

Locally there has been evidence of Roman and Anglo-Saxon activity in the middle ages, The Bridgewater Canal got to Sale in 1765 and the arrival of the railway which is now used for trams in 1849.

The A56 Washway Road and Manchester Road is well-known as the Roman Road, which goes out towards Altrincham and Dunham.

A flint arrowhead was discovered in Sale which suggests a prehistoric human presence, interestingly some local field and road names including the name of Sale itself is of Anglo-Saxon origin.

One of the first buildings built by brick was developed in 1603, it was demolished in 1920, bu two buildings are still standing and can be seen in Walkden Gardens.

Crossford Bridge which dates back to 1367 was demolished by the then government in 1745 that and other bridges in the area, to slow the on coming Jocobites, it was them though that managed to get Crossford Bridge repaired one they reached Manchester.

Sale Moor was ‘Wasteland’ and enclosed in 1807 to be divided between landowners in Sale, the land around Sale Moor was the cheapest because the soil was poor and hard to cultivate, all different in this century though as Sale Moor is a well built and a thriving village.

The Sale area was first connected to the telephone network in 1888.

During the second world war, it is estimated 600 bombs were dropped on Sale in three hours, incredibly no injuries were reported but Sale Town Hall was badly damaged, during the war a Wellington bomber crashed into Walton Park killing all six crew members, a local told us the story, she told us the captain deserved praise for managing to crash-land in the park and not into houses.

The shopping centre was built sometime in the 1960’s and is set to be changed again very soon, with a cinema and better cycling infrastructure.

 

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Categories: Sale, Sale Moor

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